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Turn Out the Lights

Kaos

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Turn Out the Lights
« on: May 24, 2024, 11:57:18 AM »
Forget being out because of Freeze. That’s still there but now I’m out in general. 

The decision allowing schools to directly pay players pushes this game I’ve loved for 50+ years into a future that doesn’t interest me.

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War Damn Six

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2024, 12:11:31 PM »
Forget being out because of Freeze. That’s still there but now I’m out in general. 

The decision allowing schools to directly pay players pushes this game I’ve loved for 50+ years into a future that doesn’t interest me.

We’ll notify the appropriate parties…
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Snaggletiger

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2024, 12:28:32 PM »
I'm not out because I love the game too much.  However, this truly is the beginning of the end.  And it's going to implode quickly. 5 years from now, we won't even recognize the sport. Sad, but greed on all levels has killed it.
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WiregrassTiger

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2024, 12:38:20 PM »
Forget being out because of Freeze. That’s still there but now I’m out in general. 

The decision allowing schools to directly pay players pushes this game I’ve loved for 50+ years into a future that doesn’t interest me.
I haven’t researched this. What is different? Is it only that the school can pay the athlete rather than the NIL entity?

If so, why is that such a big blow (like Steve gives)? It’s just changing the path that the money follows.

So, what am I missing here? Are we certain that this is not just another “stay of my lawn” rant? If it is, I fully support it, btw. And I will definitely help you burn this motherfucker down.

Come on, Pookie.
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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2024, 12:58:33 PM »
Forget being out because of Freeze. That’s still there but now I’m out in general. 

The decision allowing schools to directly pay players pushes this game I’ve loved for 50+ years into a future that doesn’t interest me.

It’s still Auburn. Not life or death. Just a school and town we love. Come on, Pookie.
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wesfau2

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2024, 01:26:08 PM »
We’ll notify the appropriate parties…

Pretty sure this is the 335th "I'm out!" declaration.
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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2024, 02:12:35 PM »
So many questions about this....

Do schools have a salary cap? Is it by sport or by school? Is there a base salary per player? How's that work for non-revenue sports?  Does a baseball player on a 1/4 athletic scholarship make the same as a women's golf player who is on a 1/2 athletic scholarship? Do scholarships get revoked and tuition/fees paid out of your salary? Will schools cut sports that are losing money? Will there still be roster limits or can a school like Alabama just pay players to keep them on the bench so they can't play for rivals? Will Title IX equalize pay for women/men players?  Will players get bonuses (for post season, or individual accolades)?

And then there's the tax implications... I travel for work (or used to before COVID). I might support a client in California and New York in the same year, and any work I do on site for that client, I pay state taxes for the work done while on site. So, these players "should" be in the same boat. You play for Michigan, well, that's fine, but you're paying taxes in Michigan, Ohio, Nebraska, and Minnesota this year.

I've always been the type of person to really limit my criticism of student athletes - they are kids on scholarship after all.. But if a College QB is getting paid 1M a year, I'm going to critique him like I do the QB of an NFL team.

And how much will tickets go up to offset the cost? I stopped giving to Auburn years ago, because of NIL. I refuse to donate to an organization who will just hand it over to student athletes so they can go buy a new car. At least when I was giving to the TUF, the money (allegedly) went to scholarships.
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Snaggletiger

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2024, 02:30:46 PM »
I haven’t researched this. What is different? Is it only that the school can pay the athlete rather than the NIL entity?

If so, why is that such a big blow (like Steve gives)? It’s just changing the path that the money follows.

So, what am I missing here? Are we certain that this is not just another “stay of my lawn” rant? If it is, I fully support it, btw. And I will definitely help you burn this motherfucker down.

Come on, Pookie.

What it means is these kids are now employees.  No way around it.  That means a lot of things, including mandatory workers comp coverage.  In Alabama, it's a lifetime medical benefit, which means any injury, no matter how slight or severe, is compensable, and if a player gets his knee busted up, the school is on the hook for that treatment until he dies.

Even if there's a way around the WC, the next step is unionization, Players Associations, strikes, lockouts etc.

That's not being Chicken Little.  Think about how much has changed in the last 3-4 years alone. It's the players who have been suing for a piece of the pie, and now they've got it. The NIL, I get.  Fine with that. 

But, make no mistake, the players are running the show from here on out, and they're going to want more and more.
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Snaggletiger

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2024, 02:41:13 PM »
from CBS Sports.  Long, but the first few paragraphs will give you the 411

The NCAA and the nation's five biggest conferences have agreed to pay nearly $2.8 billion to settle a host of antitrust claims,a monumental decision that sets the stage for a groundbreaking revenue-sharing model that could start directing millions of dollars directly to athletes as soon as the 2025 fall semester.

The Pac-12 became the final conference to sign off on the proposal Thursday when its university leaders voted to approve, according to a person with direct knowledge of the results.

The Southeastern Conference presidents and chancellors unanimously approved the deal earlier Thursday, another person with knowledge of that decision told The Associated Press. Both spoke spoke on condition of anonymity.

The Big Ten, Big 12 and Atlantic Coast Conference voted to approve earlier in the week ahead of a Thursday deadline given by the plaintiffs' attorneys.

NCAA President Charlie Baker and the commissioners of the five conferences released a joint statement Thursday evening acknowledging the settlement, calling it "an important step in the continuing reform of college sports that will provide benefits to student-athletes and provide clarity in college athletics across all divisions for years to come."


"All of Division I made today's progress possible, and we all have work to do to implement the terms of the agreement as the legal process continues," the statement read. "We look forward to working with our various student-athlete leadership groups to write the next chapter of college sports." Translation: Future Players Association

The deal still must be approved by the federal judge overseeing the case and challenges could arise, but if the agreement stands it will mark the beginning of a new era in college sports where athletes are compensated more like professionals and schools can compete for talent using direct payments.

The details in the plan signal the end of the NCAA's bedrock amateurism model that dates to its founding in 1906. Indeed, the days of NCAA punishments for athletes driving booster-provided cars started vanishing three years ago when the organization lifted restrictions on endorsement deals backed by so-called name, image and likeness money.

Now it is not far-fetched to look ahead to seasons where a star quarterback or top prospect on a college basketball team are not only cashing in big-money NIL deals but have a $100,000 school payment in the bank to play.


There are a host of details still to be determined, but the agreement calls for the NCAA and the conferences to pay $2.77 billion over 10 years to more than 14,000 former and current college athletes who say now-defunct rules prevented them from earning money from endorsement and sponsorship deals dating to 2016.

Some of that money will come from NCAA reserve funds and insurance but even though the lawsuit specifically targeted five conferences that are comprised of 69 schools (including Notre Dame), dozens of other NCAA member schools will see smaller distributions from the NCAA to cover the mammoth payout.

Schools in the Big Ten, Big 12, Atlantic Coast and Southeastern conferences will end up bearing the brunt of the settlement at a cost of about $300 million each over 10 years, the majority of which will be paid to athletes going forward.

The Pac-12 is also part of the settlement, with all 12 sharing responsibility even though Washington State and Oregon State will be the only league members left by this fall after the other 10 schools leave.

In the new compensation model, each school will be permitted but not required to set aside up to $21 million in revenue to share with athletes per year, though as revenues rise so could the cap.

Athletes in all sports would be eligible for payments and schools would be given the freedom to decide how that money is divvied up among sports programs. Scholarship limits by sport will be replaced by roster restrictions.

Whether the new compensation model is subject to the Title IX gender equity law is unknown along with whether schools will be able to bring NIL activities in-house as they hope and squeeze out the booster-run collectives that have sprouted up in the last few years to pay athletes. Both topics could lead to more lawsuits.


The class-action federal lawsuit at the center of the settlement, House v. the NCAA, was set to go to trial in January. The complaint, brought by former Arizona State swimmer Grant House and Sedona Prince, a former Oregon and current TCU basketball player, said the NCAA, along with the five wealthiest conferences, improperly barred athletes from earning endorsement money.

The suit also made the case that athletes were entitled to a piece of the billions of dollars the NCAA and those conferences earn from media rights agreements with television networks.

Amid political and public pressure, and facing the prospect of another court loss that some in college sports claimed could reach $20 billion in damages, NCAA and conference officials conceded on what has long been a core principal of the enterprise: That schools don't directly pay the athletes to play beyond a scholarship.

That principle had already been dented numerous times over the last decade.

Notably, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled against the NCAA in 2021 in a case related to education-related benefits. The narrow focus of the Alston case didn't collapse the collegiate sports system, but the strong rebuke of the NCAA's model of amateurism flung the door open to more lawsuits. Justice Brett Kavanaugh, a former Yale athlete, put it bluntly: "The bottom line is that the NCAA and its member colleges are suppressing the pay of student athletes who collectively generate billions of dollars in revenues for colleges every year."

The settlement is expected to cover two other antitrust cases facing the NCAA and major conferences that challenge athlete compensation rules. Hubbard vs. the NCAA and Carter vs. the NCAA are also currently in front of judges in the Northern District of California.

A fourth case, Fontenot vs, NCAA, creates a potential complication as it remains in a Colorado court after a judge denied a request to combine it with Carter. Whether Fontenot becomes part of the settlement is unknown and it matters because the NCAA and its conferences don't want to be on the hook for more damages should they lose in court.


"We're going to continue to litigate our case in Colorado and look forward to hearing about the terms of a settlement proposal once they're actually released and put in front of a court," said George Zelcs, a plaintiffs' attorney in Fontenot.

The solution agreed to in the settlement is landmark, but not surprising. College sports has been trending in this direction for years, with athletes receiving more and more monetary benefits and rights they say were long overdue.

In December, Baker, the former Massachusetts governor who has been on the job for 14 months, proposed creating a new tier of Division I athletics where the schools with the most resources would be required to pay at least half their athletes $30,000 per year. That suggestion, along with many other possibilities, remain under discussion.

The settlement does not make every issue facing college sports go away. There is still a question of whether athletes should be deemed employees of their schools, something Baker and other college sports leaders are fighting against.

Some type of federal legislation or antitrust exemption is likely still needed to codify the terms of the settlement, protect the NCAA from future litigation and pre-empt state laws that attempt to neuter the organization's authority. As it is, the NCAA is still facing lawsuits that challenge its ability to govern itself, including setting rules limiting multiple-time transfers.

Federal lawmakers have indicated they would like to get something done, but while several bills have been introduced none have gone anywhere.

Despite the unanswered questions, one thing is clear: Major college athletics is about to become more like professional sports than ever before.
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My doctor told me I needed to stop masturbating.  I asked him why, and he said, "because I'm trying to examine you."

WiregrassTiger

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2024, 03:12:29 PM »
What it means is these kids are now employees.  No way around it.  That means a lot of things, including mandatory workers comp coverage.  In Alabama, it's a lifetime medical benefit, which means any injury, no matter how slight or severe, is compensable, and if a player gets his knee busted up, the school is on the hook for that treatment until he dies.

Even if there's a way around the WC, the next step is unionization, Players Associations, strikes, lockouts etc.

That's not being Chicken Little.  Think about how much has changed in the last 3-4 years alone. It's the players who have been suing for a piece of the pie, and now they've got it. The NIL, I get.  Fine with that. 

But, make no mistake, the players are running the show from here on out, and they're going to want more and more.
Ok this makes sense, which is very unusual for you. And this sounds like a negative for college athletics but as long as it applies to everyone, it’s something that is navigable. If it was only some teams then I’d be more concerned. We’ve already seen major shifts in the game. I loved the 1985 game more but it is what it is.

I’m capable of adapting unlike many of you very old and antiquated people.

I’m open minded. Not as much as Wes, no. He’s a little over the top with it, which is a high jump for him.
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CCTAU

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2024, 03:22:15 PM »
So. If we go play a team in California, will they be able to tax the players like they do in the NFL?
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Five statements of WISDOM
1. You cannot legislate the poor into prosperity, by legislating the wealth out of prosperity.
2. What one person receives without working for, another person must work for without receiving.
3. The government cannot give to anybody anything that the government does not first take from somebody else.
4. You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it.
5. When half of the people get the idea that they do not have to work because the other half is going to take care of them, and when the other half gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for, that my dear friends, is the beginning of the end of any nation.

jmar

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2024, 03:57:08 PM »
Don't think we'll be hearing the word parity again like we did over the last 25 years.

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Kaos

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2024, 04:00:11 PM »
Pretty sure this is the 335th "I'm out!" declaration.

We wish your deddy had made the 336th one.
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WiregrassTiger

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2024, 04:03:06 PM »
So many questions about this....

Do schools have a salary cap? Is it by sport or by school? Is there a base salary per player? How's that work for non-revenue sports?  Does a baseball player on a 1/4 athletic scholarship make the same as a women's golf player who is on a 1/2 athletic scholarship? Do scholarships get revoked and tuition/fees paid out of your salary? Will schools cut sports that are losing money? Will there still be roster limits or can a school like Alabama just pay players to keep them on the bench so they can't play for rivals? Will Title IX equalize pay for women/men players?  Will players get bonuses (for post season, or individual accolades)?

And then there's the tax implications... I travel for work (or used to before COVID). I might support a client in California and New York in the same year, and any work I do on site for that client, I pay state taxes for the work done while on site. So, these players "should" be in the same boat. You play for Michigan, well, that's fine, but you're paying taxes in Michigan, Ohio, Nebraska, and Minnesota this year.

I've always been the type of person to really limit my criticism of student athletes - they are kids on scholarship after all.. But if a College QB is getting paid 1M a year, I'm going to critique him like I do the QB of an NFL team.

And how much will tickets go up to offset the cost? I stopped giving to Auburn years ago, because of NIL. I refuse to donate to an organization who will just hand it over to student athletes so they can go buy a new car. At least when I was giving to the TUF, the money (allegedly) went to scholarships.
Do you expect anyone to read all of this? It’s not Snag’s level but it’s entirely too  TL;DR. And I say this as a friend. You’re a much better poster than most but this was uncalled for. Cliff Notes, my man. We are all busy people.
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WiregrassTiger

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2024, 04:06:06 PM »
So. If we go play a team in California, will they be able to tax the players like they do in the NFL?
Fucking kneelers.
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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2024, 07:02:40 PM »
Do you expect anyone to read all of this? It’s not Snag’s level but it’s entirely too  TL;DR. And I say this as a friend. You’re a much better poster than most but this was uncalled for. Cliff Notes, my man. We are all busy people.

My bad. Let me make a Wiregrass-esqe version…


“What the fuck is going to happen to the teams?

And Wes is short.”
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War Damn Six

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2024, 07:15:13 PM »
My bad. Let me make a Wiregrass-esqe version…


“What the fuck is going to happen to the teams?

And Wes is short.”

I like you, sir.  You don’t say much but when you do, you get right to the point. 
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“If you're waitin' for a woman to make up her mind, you may have a long wait.” Preacher

WiregrassTiger

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #17 on: May 24, 2024, 10:55:33 PM »
My bad. Let me make a Wiregrass-esqe version…


“What the fuck is going to happen to the teams?

And Wes is short.”
This is absolutely perfect. I honestly believe you may have just made the best post in the history of the x (formerly known as Twitter). I am proud of you.
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WiregrassTiger

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #18 on: May 24, 2024, 11:14:26 PM »
from CBS Sports.  Long, but the first few paragraphs will give you the 411

The NCAA and the nation's five biggest conferences have agreed to pay nearly $2.8 billion to settle a host of antitrust claims,a monumental decision that sets the stage for a groundbreaking revenue-sharing model that could start directing millions of dollars directly to athletes as soon as the 2025 fall semester.

The Pac-12 became the final conference to sign off on the proposal Thursday when its university leaders voted to approve, according to a person with direct knowledge of the results.

The Southeastern Conference presidents and chancellors unanimously approved the deal earlier Thursday, another person with knowledge of that decision told The Associated Press. Both spoke spoke on condition of anonymity.

The Big Ten, Big 12 and Atlantic Coast Conference voted to approve earlier in the week ahead of a Thursday deadline given by the plaintiffs' attorneys.

NCAA President Charlie Baker and the commissioners of the five conferences released a joint statement Thursday evening acknowledging the settlement, calling it "an important step in the continuing reform of college sports that will provide benefits to student-athletes and provide clarity in college athletics across all divisions for years to come."


"All of Division I made today's progress possible, and we all have work to do to implement the terms of the agreement as the legal process continues," the statement read. "We look forward to working with our various student-athlete leadership groups to write the next chapter of college sports." Translation: Future Players Association

The deal still must be approved by the federal judge overseeing the case and challenges could arise, but if the agreement stands it will mark the beginning of a new era in college sports where athletes are compensated more like professionals and schools can compete for talent using direct payments.

The details in the plan signal the end of the NCAA's bedrock amateurism model that dates to its founding in 1906. Indeed, the days of NCAA punishments for athletes driving booster-provided cars started vanishing three years ago when the organization lifted restrictions on endorsement deals backed by so-called name, image and likeness money.

Now it is not far-fetched to look ahead to seasons where a star quarterback or top prospect on a college basketball team are not only cashing in big-money NIL deals but have a $100,000 school payment in the bank to play.


There are a host of details still to be determined, but the agreement calls for the NCAA and the conferences to pay $2.77 billion over 10 years to more than 14,000 former and current college athletes who say now-defunct rules prevented them from earning money from endorsement and sponsorship deals dating to 2016.

Some of that money will come from NCAA reserve funds and insurance but even though the lawsuit specifically targeted five conferences that are comprised of 69 schools (including Notre Dame), dozens of other NCAA member schools will see smaller distributions from the NCAA to cover the mammoth payout.

Schools in the Big Ten, Big 12, Atlantic Coast and Southeastern conferences will end up bearing the brunt of the settlement at a cost of about $300 million each over 10 years, the majority of which will be paid to athletes going forward.

The Pac-12 is also part of the settlement, with all 12 sharing responsibility even though Washington State and Oregon State will be the only league members left by this fall after the other 10 schools leave.

In the new compensation model, each school will be permitted but not required to set aside up to $21 million in revenue to share with athletes per year, though as revenues rise so could the cap.

Athletes in all sports would be eligible for payments and schools would be given the freedom to decide how that money is divvied up among sports programs. Scholarship limits by sport will be replaced by roster restrictions.

Whether the new compensation model is subject to the Title IX gender equity law is unknown along with whether schools will be able to bring NIL activities in-house as they hope and squeeze out the booster-run collectives that have sprouted up in the last few years to pay athletes. Both topics could lead to more lawsuits.


The class-action federal lawsuit at the center of the settlement, House v. the NCAA, was set to go to trial in January. The complaint, brought by former Arizona State swimmer Grant House and Sedona Prince, a former Oregon and current TCU basketball player, said the NCAA, along with the five wealthiest conferences, improperly barred athletes from earning endorsement money.

The suit also made the case that athletes were entitled to a piece of the billions of dollars the NCAA and those conferences earn from media rights agreements with television networks.

Amid political and public pressure, and facing the prospect of another court loss that some in college sports claimed could reach $20 billion in damages, NCAA and conference officials conceded on what has long been a core principal of the enterprise: That schools don't directly pay the athletes to play beyond a scholarship.

That principle had already been dented numerous times over the last decade.

Notably, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled against the NCAA in 2021 in a case related to education-related benefits. The narrow focus of the Alston case didn't collapse the collegiate sports system, but the strong rebuke of the NCAA's model of amateurism flung the door open to more lawsuits. Justice Brett Kavanaugh, a former Yale athlete, put it bluntly: "The bottom line is that the NCAA and its member colleges are suppressing the pay of student athletes who collectively generate billions of dollars in revenues for colleges every year."

The settlement is expected to cover two other antitrust cases facing the NCAA and major conferences that challenge athlete compensation rules. Hubbard vs. the NCAA and Carter vs. the NCAA are also currently in front of judges in the Northern District of California.

A fourth case, Fontenot vs, NCAA, creates a potential complication as it remains in a Colorado court after a judge denied a request to combine it with Carter. Whether Fontenot becomes part of the settlement is unknown and it matters because the NCAA and its conferences don't want to be on the hook for more damages should they lose in court.


"We're going to continue to litigate our case in Colorado and look forward to hearing about the terms of a settlement proposal once they're actually released and put in front of a court," said George Zelcs, a plaintiffs' attorney in Fontenot.

The solution agreed to in the settlement is landmark, but not surprising. College sports has been trending in this direction for years, with athletes receiving more and more monetary benefits and rights they say were long overdue.

In December, Baker, the former Massachusetts governor who has been on the job for 14 months, proposed creating a new tier of Division I athletics where the schools with the most resources would be required to pay at least half their athletes $30,000 per year. That suggestion, along with many other possibilities, remain under discussion.

The settlement does not make every issue facing college sports go away. There is still a question of whether athletes should be deemed employees of their schools, something Baker and other college sports leaders are fighting against.

Some type of federal legislation or antitrust exemption is likely still needed to codify the terms of the settlement, protect the NCAA from future litigation and pre-empt state laws that attempt to neuter the organization's authority. As it is, the NCAA is still facing lawsuits that challenge its ability to govern itself, including setting rules limiting multiple-time transfers.

Federal lawmakers have indicated   :facepalm: :facepalm::facepalm:they would like to get something done, but while several bills have been introduced none have gone anywhere.

Despite the unanswered questions, one thing is clear: Major college athletics is about to become more like professional sports than ever before.
the shareholders of this message board have to pay for the  bandwidth that is used. And I happen to know that they are tired of your long winded diatribes. If they liked you, it would be one thing. But I’m in some text groups and secret forums that indicate otherwise. I’m only trying to warn you. Cut back on the number of ridiculously long and boring posts. And quit trying to be funny. It has never worked. I would recommend sticking to posting about something that you know something about. Well, never mind. That’s impossible.

Just keep doing the same shit, I guess. But remember, I warned you. Either you are bound to get banned or have the fuck slapped out of you by Wes. Those of us who are sorry for you because of the retardation cannot be with you every moment to protect you.


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Snaggletiger

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Re: Turn Out the Lights
« Reply #19 on: May 25, 2024, 09:30:25 AM »
I like ice cream
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My doctor told me I needed to stop masturbating.  I asked him why, and he said, "because I'm trying to examine you."